Jesus Heals Blind Bartimaeus

 

And they came to Jericho. And as he was leaving Jericho with his disciples and a great crowd, Bartimaeus, a blind beggar, the son of Timaeus, was sitting by the roadside. And when he heard that it was Jesus of Nazareth, he began to cry out and say, “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!” And many rebuked him, telling him to be silent. But he cried out all the more, “Son of David, have mercy on me!” And Jesus stopped and said, “Call him.” And they called the blind man, saying to him, “Take heart. Get up; he is calling you.” And throwing off his cloak, he sprang up and came to Jesus. And Jesus said to him, “What do you want me to do for you?” And the blind man said to him, “Rabbi, let me recover my sight.” And Jesus said to him, “Go your way; your faith has made you well.” And immediately he recovered his sight and followed him on the way. (Mark 10:46-52)

Among the various good things Jesus is known as, he is also the Son of David. In the case of the Lord Jesus who was about to leave Jericho there was a blind beggar who needed the healing touch of the Lord. Would the Saviour of the world pass him by? Not at all, because Jesus heard his cry. If Bartimaeus would have chosen to fear the crowd he wouldn’t have called Jesus as the Son of David. Despite pressure from the crowd who tried to force him to stop crying out to the Lord, this man called for mercy from Jesus. Finally, Jesus said, “Call him” and the crowd now encouraged the blind man to come closer to Christ. Then the Lord asked him what does he want to be done for him. The blind man knew what is the most important thing for him which is nothing less than the recovery of his sight. And that is what he asked for.

Jesus then told him, “Go your way; your faith has made you well.” And indeed the blind man was able to see. Praise be to God!

the Lord opens the eyes of the blind. The Lord lifts up those who are bowed down; the Lord loves the righteous. (Psalm 146:8)

Bartimaeus had no option. He knew it’s going to be Son of David that day who could heal him or nobody else. When he referred to Jesus as the Son of David it was a great thing to say in those times. Because the Romans hated any competitor to the throne of Israel. Also for the Pharisees it would mean someone they must not refuse to give heed to in matters of the Law of Moses. While for the general Jews it would mean he was not just their King but also their Messiah. So calling Jesus rightfully as the Son of David had serious implications and yet Bartimaeus choose faith and not fear. He kept crying out to Jesus and was not ashamed of the Lord.

I pray that more people who are in need of healing, stop getting bothered by the naysayers, and reach out to Christ in prayer. I pray those who desire healing, become even bolder that Bartimaeus. Let them be bold against their past and simply believe in the Lord Jesus. Amen.

Verses for reflection:

  • Then Elisha prayed and said, “O Lord, please open his eyes that he may see.” So the Lord opened the eyes of the young man, and he saw, and behold, the mountain was full of horses and chariots of fire all around Elisha. (2 Kings 6:17)
  • You will open the eyes of the blind. You will free the captives from prison, releasing those who sit in dark dungeons. “I am the Lord; that is my name! I will not give my glory to anyone else, nor share my praise with carved idols. Everything I prophesied has come true, and now I will prophesy again. I will tell you the future before it happens.” (Isaiah 42:7-9)
  • And I will lead the blind in a way that they do not know, in paths that they have not known I will guide them. I will turn the darkness before them into light, the rough places into level ground. These are the things I do, and I do not forsake them.
     (Isaiah 42:16)
  • “The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he has anointed me to proclaim good news to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim liberty to the captives and recovering of sight to the blind, to set at liberty those who are oppressed (Luke 4:18)

 

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Posted on December 8, 2015, in Deliverance, Praise and worship, Reflections and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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